PUBLIC INFORMATION SERIES

 

REPRESENTATIONAL PLANNING, ENGINEERING, ENVIRONMENTAL & TECHNOLOGY EXHIBITS
PRESENTATION 2017



OFFSHORE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT PLATFORM INTERMODAL & INTERCONNECTIVITY ELEMENTS

 


STUDY CREDIT

Intermodal passenger transport involves more than one mode of transport of passengers.

Some modes of transportation have always been intermodal; for example, most major airports have extensive facilities for automobile parking and have good rail or bus connections to the cities nearby. Urban bus systems generally serve train and subway stations and often extend to the local airport. A major goal of modern intermodal passenger transport, at least in developed countries, is to reduce dependence on the automobile as the major mode of ground transportation and increase use of public transport. To encourage them to do this, Intermodal Journey planners are used to make users aware of possible services and to facilitate their use.

Passenger transport has always been intermodal. People switched from carriages to ferries at the edge of a river too deep to ford. In the 19th century, people who lived inland switched from train to ship for overseas voyages. Hoboken Terminal in Hoboken, New Jersey was built to let commuters to New York City from New Jersey switch to ferries to cross the Hudson River in order to get to Manhattan. A massive ferry slip, now in ruins, was incorporated into the terminal building. Later, when a subway was built through tunnels under the Hudson, now called the PATH, a station stop was added to Hoboken Terminal.

More recently, the New Jersey Transit's Hudson-Bergen Light Rail system has included a stop there, but it is a relatively long walk from the terminal building. Ferry service has recently been revived, but passengers must exit the terminal and walk across the pier to the more modest ferry slip.

 

San Diego International Offshore Airport Ferry & Cruise Line Terminal Studies 2011

 

TBNC OPLAT AUTODESK® 1:1 ENGINEERING PLAN SET EXHIBIT 14/34
INTERMODAL INTERCONNECTIVITY CONCURRENT STUDIES 2017

San Diego Offshore International Airport Platform Interconnectivity Studies

 

TBNC OPLAT AUTODESK® 1:1 ENGINEERING PLAN SET EXHIBITS
CRUISELINE & SEA FERRY PORT CONCURRENT STUDIES 2014 - 2017

San Diego Offshore International Airport Program Seaport & Ferry Terminal Access Plan View OPLAT 2011 TBNC

 

An airport rail link is a service providing passenger rail transport from an airport to a nearby city; by mainline or commuter trains, rapid transit, people mover or light rail.

Direct links operate straight to the airport terminal, while other systems require an intermediate use of people mover or shuttle bus.

Although airport rail links have been popular solutions in Europe and Japan for decades, only recently have links been constructed in North America and Oceania, and the rest of Asia. Advantages for the rider include faster travel time and easy interconnection with other public transport, while authorities have benefited from less highway and parking congestion, less pollution, and additional business opportunities. Additionally, the links benefit airports by drawing in more passengers via easy access.

Dedicated railway lines to airports have become popular since the 1980s, with airport terminals for airport express, intercity and commuter trains, allowing one-seat travel to the check-in halls. This solution requires the building of new track; a cheaper option being establishing a new station of an existing line connected to the airport by people mover or shuttle bus.

Integration with intercity services has produced alliances where airlines sell connecting service by rail. Central Europe has seen integration of high-speed rail into airports, with TGV and ICE services domestically and internationally operated directed from Charles de Gaulle International Airport and Frankfurt Airport. Because of this many airport stations have received IATA codes.

Other airports have instead chosen to focus on an airport express train dedicated to high-speed transport from the airport to the city centre; a solution often opted for where the airport is located outside the urban area and mass transit system, but where a direct downtown service is required, such as Flytoget serving Oslo Airport, Gardermoen. Other airports are served by both express trains and rapid transit, such as London Heathrow Airport.

 

 

 

PLATFORM INTERIOR CIRCULATION

Representational Study Wayfinding Applications & Methodologies

www.weburbanist.com

Combining a novel form of wayfinding with a nod to the upcoming 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo,
this new airport terminal trades moving walkways for a color-coded circuit of racetrack paths [or runways, if you will].

The airport extension to Narita International anticipates the additional capacity needed in a few years for the upcoming event but also reflects a limited budget for expansion, together driving a design that needs no illuminated signs and skips people-moving devices.

 

Blue Line Wayfinding to Departure Gates

Blue leads to departures and red takes people to arrivals – a simple scheme but easily visible when set against the more monotone surrounding interiors. The collaborative project featured contributions by PARTY with consultants from Nikken [photography credits Kenta Hasegawa].

http://prty.jp

Contact Information
Hillside Terrace F-201, 18-8 Sarugaku-cho, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo, JAPAN 150-0033
+81-3-5489-2901 Contact · +81-3-5489-2902 Facsimile

Tokyu Toyoko Line: 3-minute walk from Daikanyama Station

Of course, we all know the experience of being late for takeoff – beyond its aesthetics, it could indeed prove quite useful to have fast and slow lanes during busy times and for those whose commutes demand they make their plane in time.

 

 


 

 

San Diego Offshore International Airport Archimedes Bridge Studies
San Diego Offshore International Airport Archimedes Bridge Studies

 

 

San Diego Offshore International Airport Fixed Wing Interconnectivity Programs

San Diego Offshore International Airport Roraty Wing Interconnectivity Studies 2011

 

For airports built within or close to the city limits, extending mass transit systems like rapid transit or light rail to airport terminals allows full integration with other public transport in the city, and seamless transport to all parts of town. Service frequency will be high, although travel time is a drawback as the services make many intermediate stops before reaching the city center. A common solution involves building a separate people mover from a mass transit station to the airport terminal, often using automated systems, allowing faster travel time and fare discrimination, for instance Orlyval. Other systems operate as separate rapid transit lines from major mass transit terminals, such as AirTrain JFK.

 

Return to Offshore International Airport Platform HOME Page

 

an interdisciplinary planning & design collaboration

www.TBNC-California.com

7040 AVENIDA ENCINAS   ·  SUITE 104.299
CARLSBAD   ·  CALIFORNIA 92011.4652

760.729.9231 CORPORATE   ·    760.434.5869 FACSIMILE

 

 

© 2008-2017 COPYRIGHT

All components and elements depicted within this publication, including the design, configuration, narrative and discussions,
and the presentation in abstract, unless otherwise stated, is the sole property of TBNC.

Copyright and other Intellectual Property Laws protect this material.

Reproduction or transmission of this material, in whole or in part, in any manner, without the prior written consent
of the copyright holder, is a violation of copyright law.