PUBLIC INFORMATION SERIES


REPRESENTATIONAL PLANNING, ENGINEERING, ENVIRONMENTAL & TECHNOLOGY EXHIBITS
PRESENTATION 2017

 

DEMONSTRATED NEED

 

* The San Diego County Regional Airport Authority [SDCRAA], summarizing exhaustive studies has opined in the absence of a second runway at Lindbergh Field, developed to the requirements of international flag carriers, the San Diego Region experiences a negative economic impact in the tens of billions of dollars.

 

TBNC Edgemon Offshore International Airport Platform Program San Diego, California USA Edgemon Environmnetla Planning USA

 

 

COMPARABLE OPLAT / SAN SCALE EXHIBIT REDUCED TBNC GENERATED AUTODESK© 1:1 FORMAT ISSUE 04/34

2017 EXPANDED OPERATIONAL STUDIES

San Diego Offshore International Airport Platfrom TBNC Program 2011

REPRESENTATIONAL AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL PROCEDURES AT SAN DIEGO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT [SDIA]

SDIA has only one runway, requiring aircraft to depart to the west, or the east, depending on the surface wind direction. Prevailing westerly winds dictate that aircraft depart using Runway 27 [over the ocean] approximately 95% of the time. East departures [over Balboa Park] occur less than 5% of the time [usually during periods of Santa Ana type winds or inclement weather]. Air carrier aircraft departing SDIA to the west are normally assigned [by FAA air traffic personnel] a magnetic compass heading of either 275 degrees or 290 degrees [northwest] depending on the destination airport. For example, for Runway 27 departures aircraft landing at Los Angeles, San Francisco, and airports west and northwest of San Diego, aircraft are usually assigned an initial departure heading of 290 degrees (a "right turn" of approximately 15 degrees after takeoff). Aircraft destined for Phoenix, Denver, Dallas and airports east of San Diego receive an initial heading of 275 degrees [a "straight out" departure].

The number of aircraft using each route varies depending on airline schedules and FAA air traffic controllers' discretions, but historically has often been close to a 50/50 split. There are no ground based navigational aids usable for providing departing aircraft precision guidance over the ground.

 

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FAA Aerospace Forecast Fiscal Years 2011–2031
Brief Study Support Documentation

Over the past decade the commercial air carrier industry has suffered several major shocks that have led to reduced demand for air travel. These shocks include the terror attacks of September 11, skyrocketing prices for fuel, and a global recession. To manage through this period of extreme volatility, air carriers fine-tuned their business models with the aim of minimizing financial losses. To lower operating costs, carriers eliminated unprofitable routes and grounded older, less fuel efficient aircraft. To increase operating revenues, carriers charged separately for services historically bundled in the price of ticket and initiated new services which customers were willing to purchase. The capacity discipline exhibited by the carriers and their focus on additional revenue streams bolstered the industry to profitability in 2010 (for the first time since 2007). Going into the next decade, there is cautious optimism that the industry has been transformed from one of a boom-to-bust cycle to one of sustainable profits.

 

San Diego Offshore International Airport Platform FAA Support Study Publication Files 2011

The global economy is growing again, reviving the demand for air travel. Profitability for the U.S. carriers will hinge on a stable environment for fuel prices, an increase in demand for corporate air travel, the ability to pass along fare increases to leisure travelers, and the generation of ancillary revenues. To navigate the volatile operating environment, mainline carriers will continue to drive down their costs by better matching flight frequencies and/or aircraft gauge with demand, delaying deliveries of newer aircraft and/or grounding older aircraft, and pressuring regional affiliates to accept lower fees for contract flying. Over the long term, we see a competitive and profitable industry characterized by increasing demand for air travel and airfares growing more slowly than inflation.

San Diego Offshore International Airport Platform Airspace Studies FAA Credits 2011

 

 

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